Week 88: 100% White Whole-Wheat

Do you have a whole-wheat bread hater in your life? Trick them with this bread made with white wheat, as opposed to the more common red. It’s as soft and squishy as Wonder Bread, but much more nutritious. Flour milled from white wheat looks and acts more like refined (all-purpose) flour, but still contains the bran, germ and endosperm. It’s got a milder flavor and softer texture than red wheat loaves, but is just as good for you.

  • 384g white whole wheat
  • 30g vital wheat gluten
  • 7g yeast
  • 10g salt
  • 36g brown sugar
  • 300g water
  • 3 Tbsp butter, cut in little cubes
  • 2 tsp apple cider vinegar (or lemon juice, or plain vinegar)
  1. Measure the dry ingredients into the bowl of a stand mixer.
  2. Whisk to combine.
  3. Heat water to 120°F.
  4. Cut butter into little cubes, then add to hot water and stir to melt.
  5. Add the vinegar.
  6. Place bowl in mixer and knead on lowest speed with the dough hook while slowly add the water.
  7. Scrape the sides with a rubber spatula to help encourage total incorporation.
  8. Once it’s all mixed together, increase to speed #2 and knead for 10 – 20 minutes, scraping sides occasionally with a rubber spatula. You want the dough to be coming away from the sides on it’s own. . If you knead on speed #2 you’re not in danger of over kneading, so be patient – it’ll happen.
  9. Cover and let rest in a warm place for 30 – 60 minutes, until doubled in size.
  10. Lightly oil your work surface, and scrape the dough out from the bowl.
  11. Shape into a rectangle about 8″ wide, so it fits into a 8″ x 4″ loaf pan.
  12. Roll into a loaf using the head and shoulders method.
  13. Please in an oiled loaf pan, seam side down. Or line with parchment paper.
  14. Cover and let rest in a warm place for about 30 minutes, so that it is puffed up enough to be a little over the rim of the loaf pan. You don’t want it to puff up too much, because you want some of the rising to take place in the oven.
  15. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  16. Just before baking, dust with a little flour, and make 3~5 diagonal slashes
  17. Turn oven down to 350 and bake 30 minutes, until golden brown and internal temperature is 190 degrees.
  18. Let cool on a wire rack.

Week 79: Old Fashioned Country Loaf

This is a large, heavy loaf that will satisfy you for a few days, and it makes a great contribution for a weekend getaway with friends and family. You can throw the ingredients together in the evening before bedtime, then bake it the next day, or start it it first thing in the morning, then bake in the evening. Made with whole grains (white, whole wheat and rye), it is definitely a bread to make again and again.

  • 480g bread flour
  • 1/4 c vital wheat gluten
  • 135g old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 75g whole wheat flour
  • 40g rye flour
  • 10g sugar
  • 12g salt
  • 1/2 tsp yeast
  • 5 Tbsp (70g) butter, softened
  • 510g water

Step 1: (Day 1) Make dough

  1. Place all ingredients in the bowl of a stand mixer, fitted with the paddle attachment.
  2. Mix to incorporate on the lowest speed, scraping down the sides to get the dry bits in, then mix for one minute on the fastest speed (it’s very fast!).
  3. Cover bowl and set aside to rise on the countertop for at least 8 hours, or up to 12.

Step 2 (Next day): Knead and shape

  1. Remove to a lightly floured work surface
  2. Sprinkle flour around the circle, then lift sides and scape the flour under.
  3. Pull sides out a bit to form a rectangle.
  4. Gently life the ride side, stretch it out a bit, then fold it over to the center.
  5. Repeat with the left side.
  6. Stretch the top end up and out a bit, then roll down. You don’t want to squish the air out, but you want it to be stable.
  7. Pull out the top end to fold over the side then tuck it under. See “How to shape a batard” video on the Tips page.
  1. Create a taught surface by cupping the dough with your hands and rotating it around while tucking under the sides.
  2. Flour a lined banatonne and place the dough in, seam side up. (I made the first version, pictured below, in a round basket, but the second time around I used an oval shape for easier slicing.
  3. Let rise 1~2 hours, or overnight in the fridge.
  • Cut a sling out of parchment paper. It’s a heavy dough, so I do a double sling.
  • Lay the sling down on top of the dough, then put a cutting board on top of that.
  • Flip, then remove the basket
  • very heavy very large need a sturdy sling
  • Baking times for Dutch ovens:
    • Use a cookie sheet on the bottom rack to deflect heat
    • If you don’t put it in cold, then bake at 475 for 25 minutes, take off top, and bake at 425 for 15 minutes more, or until it reaches 205 degrees.
    • From the fridge: Bake at 425 for 35 minutes covered, then 10 – 15 uncovered.
  • If kitchen really hot overnight: ferment it three hours and them put it in the fridge overnight.
  • Day of: Ferment 8 hours
  • Or you could increase the yeast a bit. This would shorten the rise time, and have only a slight affect on flavor and texture. I think if you use 1 teaspoon yeast (instead of 1/2 teaspoon) the first rise could be shortened to 4-5 hours. The second rise will also go quicker as well.
  • This recipe should fill two standard loaf pans, (8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″) and bake for 30-40 minutes or until the interior registers 190°F on an instant thermometer. Annabelle@KAF  375 degrees tent foil over the top during the first part of baking
  • make this in my 4.5 qt cast iron dutch oven. I let it rise for 12 hours at room temperature. then work it on a floured board and transfer it to a bowl lined with floured parchment paper for one hour. I preheat the oven to 450 degrees for about an hour. At the half hour mark I place the Dutch oven in the oven to preheat. Be careful pulling it outRead more about review stating I make this
  • as it is very hot. I transfer the dough to the dutch oven place the lid back on and bake for 25 minutes. I then remove the lid and bake an additional 12 minutes. I came up with these times though trial and error along with advice from King Arthur helpline. it comes lightly brown and crusty
  •  baked it in a 10″ dutch oven (50 min with lid on and 15 min with lid off — perfect!). I let it rise the first time about 18 hours at room temp
  • Or you could increase the yeast a bit. This would shorten the rise time, and have only a slight affect on flavor and texture. I think if you use 1 teaspoon yeast (instead of 1/2 teaspoon) the first rise could be shortened to 4-5 hours. The second rise will also go quicker as well.
  • 1 Tbs (15g) less water, halved the sugar, added to a preheated empty pot instead of cold start (parchment “sling” works great). The second time dough was easier to handle and bread had much betterRead more about review stating So good and so
  • oven spring, with an airier crumb.
  • The second thing you can try is to preheat your Dutch oven base (if the manufacturer says that’s OK) with the oven

https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/recipes/no-knead-oat-bread-recipe

 oven once it came to 205. This is a hit with the whole family and will definitely make again!

Week 61: Easiest Bread Ever

I’ve spent the last year and a half learning how to bake bread. It’s been fun, not always easy, and to be honest, not always successful. There are so many nuances to it: proper kneading techniques, making sure you don’t over-proof or under-proof the dough, getting the flour-to-water ratios just right, understanding the gluten structure of different types of flour, and having all the right tools — not to mention enough time — for all the steps.

When I came across this method I was very skeptical because it kind of goes against everything I’d learned so far. For one thing, it only takes about 15 minutes to throw together, if that. After a 10-minute rest, a bit of shaping, then a 30-minute rise, it’s ready to bake. You “knead” it in a stand mixer with the paddle attachment (!) on high (!!) for just two minutes. It doesn’t compare to an artisan loaf with it’s overnight ferment and beautiful open crumb, but it makes a perfectly acceptable sandwich loaf and best of all, it’s something you can make on the fly.

I’ve listed the ingredients (in grams) so you can make your loaf along with the video instruction linked below. I also made four different versions so you have the option to make either a whole wheat, white, oatmeal raisin or ryre.

  • 300g bread or all pupose flour < OR >
    • Whole wheat: 240g whole wheat flour+ 60g bread or all purpose flour
    • Oatmeal raisin: 300g bread or all purpose flour + 50g oats
    • Rye: 125g rye flour + 175g bread or all purpose flour
  • 7g (2 tsp) yeast
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup milk (any kind: dairy, oat, almond, soy, etc.) at 120 degrees
  • 2 Tbsp honey < OR >
    • Whole wheat: 2 Tbsp brown sugar
    • Oatmeal raisin: 2 Tbsp maple syrup + 1 tsp cinammon
    • Rye: 1 Tbsp sugar + 2 tsp caraway seeds + 1 tsp dill seeds
  • 1 egg (if you want to omit the egg, use 1 Tbsp oil in its place)
  • 2 Tbsp oil or melted butter (I use butter for the white and oat versions)

Notes:

  1. The video is for the whole wheat version. I translated the cup measurements into grams because it’s so much more accurate. If you don’t have a scale, it’s 1-2/3 cups whole wheat flour + 1/3 cup all-purpose or bread flour.
  2. She uses 1/4 cup of flour once the batter is mixed to stiffen it up a bit. I add it in one tablespoon at a time, because you might not need that much, and if you dump it all in at once, you can’t take it back.
  3. You can use 8 x 4 loaf pan if that’s all you have, but 9 x 5 is better
  4. She doesn’t grease her pan, but I went ahead and greased mine just in case
  5. If you let it rise for too long, and it gets too high, you’ll over-proof it, and it’ll collapse in the oven. So no highter than 1″ for sure. It’s always better to underproof a little than over proof!
  6. Mine definitely got too dark on the top, so do cover with foil

If you want all whole wheat try Week 21: 100% Whole Wheat from Year 2020. It’s a bit more complicated (a lot, really), but well worth the effort for such a healthy, delicious result!