Week 84: Rye Sourdough (35%)

I’ve been working on making 100% rye bread, but have yet to make one that I thought was any good. And then it occurred to me that maybe I just don’t like bread made with only rye flour. I decided to nix that goal, and make a rye/wheat version. This loaf is only 35% rye, but the addition of the caraway seeds and barley malt syrup gives it a great flavor and I’m really happy with it.

I found this on the Foodgeek’s YouTube channel. He is one of my favorite bakers, and I highly recommend checking out his channel if you’re serious about learning how to bake good bread. He’s also got two great tutorials on scoring, so I’ve linked those as well.

I’ve listed the amounts of all the ingredients so you can have them at the ready and follow along with him in while watching the video that’s linked below. He makes two loaves; I’ve listed what you need for one and two. Because you need to activate your sourdough the night before, and the loaves have a final rest overnight in the fridge, this takes 3 days total.

1 LoafIngredients2 Loaves
260gBread Flour520g
180gWhite Rye Flour360g
40gDark Rye Flour80g
268gWater536g
80gStarter160g
10gMalt Syrup20g
8gSalt16g
5gCaraway Seeds10g

Tips:

  1. I only had white rye, so used whole wheat in place of the dark rye.
  2. I did not have bread flour, so measured out all purpose flour, took away 2 tablespoons and then added 2 tablespoons of vital wheat gluten.
  3. I used my stand mixer with the paddle attachment to mix the dough.
  4. I lightly oiled my countertop before shaping the dough. He doesn’t use flour to keep his dough from sticking, but I think his countertop is made from a material that is more of a non-stick surface. Mine is wood, so it needs flour, oil, or water. I didn’t want to be adding flour to the dough, so I used oil.
  5. I did 4 stretch and folds (with 30 minute rests after each one) just like he does. But then I did 2 coil folds after that, so my total rest period was an hour longer. See Video page for links to both methods.
  6. 20 grams of malt syrup is about 1 tablespoon, as is 10g caraway seeds.
  7. I mixed seame seeds in with the caraways seeds, mostly for looks.
  8. I forgot to add the seeds before placing the shaped dough in the proffing basket. If you need to add them after the dough’s been proofed, lightly spray the loaf with water, then add seeds, then score.

Week 83: Nutmeg Apple Bread

This makes a nice change from cinnamon raisin bread. It’s based on King Arthur Baking’s version here, and I’ve made a few adjustments, and added some suggestions to avoid some of the problems I encountered when I made it first time around.

Continue reading “Week 83: Nutmeg Apple Bread”

Week 82: Lyon Bakery’s Multigrain

This bread flies in the face of everything I’ve learned about bread baking over the last two years. It’s not a super wet dough, yet you don’t have to knead it, and it has only one proofing stage. After stirring the mixture of grains and seeds for 10 minutes (with a fork!), you then shape it, and drop it in a loaf pan to rise. With seven grains (oats, semolina, millet, white, whole wheat, rye and spelt) and three seeds (flax, sesame, sunflower), this is an even healthier version of the only commercial bread we still buy: Silver Hill’s Squirrely Bread. That’s a sprouted wheat bread, something I doubt I’ll ever get around to baking.

The recipe comes from an article in The Washington Post’s Lifestyle Magazine, “How to make a superior multigrain bread, without kneading” from July, 2016. The amounts are in Imperial units (US ounces) which is a crazy way to measure, so I’ve listed the ingredients below in grams, AND halved them, to make two small loaves, using 8″ x 4.5″ loaf pans. I also made an egg wash of one egg yolk and a splash of milk. This makes a nice dark, shiny crust. I don’t roll the dough in the seeds, but rather wait until they’ve risen, then paint it on the loaves and sprinkle on the seeds. Here’s the listing of the bread on the bakery’s website.

  • .5 oz rolled oats (not quickk-cooking or instant)
  • .75 oz flaxseed
  • .75 oz sesame seeds
  • .75 oz sunflower seeds (I prefer roasted, salted)
  • .75 oz semolina flour
  • .50 oz millet or bulgar
  • 1/2 cup 95 degree water
  1. Combine the oats, seeds, semolina, millet (or bulgar) in a small bowl. Stir in the hot and thoroughly combine.
  2. Cover and let sit at room temperature for at least two hours.
  • 340g flour
  • 85g whole wheat
  • 45g rye
  • 25g spelt
  • 42g honey
  • 1-1/2 tsp yeast
  • 8 g salt
  • 2 cups room temperature water
  1. Measure the flours in a large bowl and wisk to combine.
  2. Add the soaked-grain mixture, and then add the honey and yeast on one side, and the salt on the other.
  3. Add the water, then begin stirring with a large, sturdy fork. Don’t try to skip this step by mixing in your stand mixer, it is too dense to use a machine.
  4. Keep mixing for 10 minutes to form a fairly smooth, firm dough. The temperature should be between 76 to 80 degrees on an instant-read thermometer.
  5. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled contertop.
  6. Divide it in half, then pat it into a rectangle.
  7. Use the head and sholders method to shape into a log.
  8. Tuck the sides under, then place in very lightly buttered loaf pans.
  1. Cover and let proof for about 2 hours, or until doubled.
  2. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 475 degrees.
  3. Once risen, brush loaves with egg yolk mixture, then sprinkle with sesame and sunflower seeds.
  4. When ready to bake, throw some ice cubes into the oven before placing the pans in.
  5. Reduce temperature to 400 and bake for 35-45 minutes, tenting tops with foil if they get too brown.
  6. Cool loves on a wire rack l for 1 hour before removing from the pans.
  7. Let cool completely before slicing.
Dough has risen to about 1″ about rim.

Week 81: Signature Loaf

This is the perfect go-to bread for any occasion. It’s easy enough to be a weekly bake, and makes an impressive contribution to a shared meal. It’s got multiple grains and seeds for flavor, milk and butter for texture, and the overnight fermentation gives both the flavor and the texture an additional boost. If you’re looking for a single grain loaf, with a similar result, check out Week 62’s Low-Knead Bread. You won’t be disappointed!

Step 1: Make pre-ferment (overnight rest)

  • 340g room temp water
  • 3g yeast
  • 180g bread flour
  • 50g rye flour
  1. Mix the sponge ingredients with the handle of a wooden spoon until flour is thoroughly combined with the water.
  2. Cover, and let rest at room temperature, covered, for at least 4 hours, but preferabley overnight.

Step 2: Make dough (2 hour rest)

  • 12g salt
  • 4g sugar
  • 180g bread flour
  • 90g whole wheat flour
  • 30g dry whole milk powder
  • 30g softened butter (2 Tbsp)
  • 1 Tbsp each sesame, flax, hemp and chia seeds
  • 1/4 cup multi-grain cereal mix
  1. Combine the flours, sugar, salt and sesame seeds/multi-grain cereal mix into the bowl of a stand mixer. Whisk to combine.
  2. Empty the biga into the bowl, scraping the sides tof the biga bowl to get it all.
  3. Mix until incorporated, with the handle of a wooden spoon, (or your hand, squeezing the dough between your fingers).
  4. Once it’s all mixed together, place bowl in machine, and knead with dough hook for 5 minutes on speed #2, adding the butter, one little chunck at a time.
  5. Stop to scrape down the sides and the dough hook. Make sure there’s no dry bits on the bottom.
  6. Knead for 5 more minutes, still on #2, until it is sticking to itself more than the bowl. It won’t totally clean off the sides of the bowl and be all stuck on the hook like some doughs.
  1. Scrape down sides with a bowl scraper, cover and let rest for 15 minutes.
  2. Turn out until a lightly oiled surface. Flatten out a bit, then fold sides over on itself towards the middle to form a circle. Turn over and shape into a ball.
  1. Place the dough in a greased bowl, seam side down, cover and let rest 30 minutes.
  2. Turn out until a lightly oiled surface. Flatten out a bit, Do two envelope folds/ First fold top third down, then bottom third over that. Then fold the left third over, and the right third over that.
  1. Return dough to the greased bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place 1-2 hours (if you kitchen is colder than 72 degrees, warm up an EMPTY microwave, then store it there), until doubled in size.

Step 3: Shape dough (1 hour rest)

  1. Turn the dough out onto a lightly oiled countertop, and gently press into a square.
  2. Flatten out a bit, then fold sides over on itself towards the middle to form a circle. Turn over and shape into a ball.
  3. Cup it with your hands and rotate, pulling the sides down a bit to make the surface taut.
  4. Then slide a bit to make the surface taut. See video for shaping dough on the Tips page.
  5. Lightly dust the surface, and smooth with your hand.
  6. Place dough ball, seam side down, into a lined banetton (or a bowl lined with a tea towel) that’s been dusted with flour. Pinch seams together to tighten.
  1. Cover and let rise for about 30 minutes to an hour. It will continue to rise in the oven, so this second rise does not need to be for as long as the first. Better to be slightly under-proofed, than over-proofed.
  2. Meanwhile, preheat over to 475 degrees, with a Dutch oven inside, and have at the ready a parchment paper sling.

Step 4: Bake dough

  1. Place a the parchment sling on top of the basket/bowl, and flip it over.
  2. Remove bowl from dough, scape off any excessive amounts of flour, and score.
  3. Remove pan from oven, and place dough inside. Cover and put in oven.
  4. Turn oven down to 450 degrees.
  5. Bake about 30 minutes, uncover and back 5 more, until crust is dark golden, and internal temperature is 190-200 degrees.
  6. Remove from pot, then place in turned off oven with door open so it can cool down in a dry place.
  7. Cool completely before slicing.

Week 80: Thanksgiving Loaves

Representing the three pies we make at Thanksgiving: Apple, Pumpkin and Pecan. This is a good use of any leftover pumpkin or applesauce you might have, so you can use any combination of the two. Or, just one if that’s all you’ve got. I use mini loaf pans so that I can freeze them and have them at the ready over the holidays when folks drop in for tea, or as hostess gifts.

  •  4 large eggs
  •  1-1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1-1/2 cups applesauce
  • 1-1/2 cups canned pumpkin
  •  2 sticks unsalted butter
  •  3 cups flour
  •  1 Tbsp baking soda
  •  1 tsp salt
  • 3/4 tsp cinammon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 36 pecan halves, or sliced almonds
  1. Preheat oven to 350.
  2. Butter and flour 6 mini loaf tins, or 2 loaf tins.
  3. Melt butter, and allow to cool.
  4. WIth the paddle attachement, on high speed, (increase speed in increments so that it doesn’t splash all over the place), mix the eggs and the sugar until light and fluffy and a very pale yellow.
  5. Add the applesauce and pumpkin and mix to combine.
  6. Add the cooled, melted butter, and mix to combine.
  7. Measure the dry ingredients into a separate mixing bowl, and wisk to combine
  8. Add the dry tingredients to the wet in batches, mixing until incorporated. Do not over beat.
  9. Pour into prepared tins. Decorate with nuts.
  10. Bake about 25-35 minutes. Same baking time for mini vs loaves, but watch them towards the end.

Week 79: Old Fashioned Country Loaf

This is a large, heavy loaf that will satisfy you for a few days, and it makes a great contribution for a weekend getaway with friends and family. You can throw the ingredients together in the evening before bedtime, then bake it the next day, or start it it first thing in the morning, then bake in the evening. Made with whole grains (white, whole wheat and rye), it is definitely a bread to make again and again.

  • 480g bread flour
  • 1/4 c vital wheat gluten
  • 135g old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 75g whole wheat flour
  • 40g rye flour
  • 10g sugar
  • 12g salt
  • 1/2 tsp yeast
  • 5 Tbsp (70g) butter, softened
  • 510g water

Step 1: (Day 1) Make dough

  1. Place all ingredients in the bowl of a stand mixer, fitted with the paddle attachment.
  2. Mix to incorporate on the lowest speed, scraping down the sides to get the dry bits in, then mix for one minute on the fastest speed (it’s very fast!).
  3. Cover bowl and set aside to rise on the countertop for at least 8 hours, or up to 12.

Step 2 (Next day): Knead and shape

  1. Remove to a lightly floured work surface
  2. Sprinkle flour around the circle, then lift sides and scape the flour under.
  3. Pull sides out a bit to form a rectangle.
  4. Gently life the ride side, stretch it out a bit, then fold it over to the center.
  5. Repeat with the left side.
  6. Stretch the top end up and out a bit, then roll down. You don’t want to squish the air out, but you want it to be stable.
  7. Pull out the top end to fold over the side then tuck it under. See “How to shape a batard” video on the Tips page.
  1. Create a taught surface by cupping the dough with your hands and rotating it around while tucking under the sides.
  2. Flour a lined banatonne and place the dough in, seam side up. (I made the first version, pictured below, in a round basket, but the second time around I used an oval shape for easier slicing.
  3. Let rise 1~2 hours, or overnight in the fridge.
  • Cut a sling out of parchment paper. It’s a heavy dough, so I do a double sling.
  • Lay the sling down on top of the dough, then put a cutting board on top of that.
  • Flip, then remove the basket
  • very heavy very large need a sturdy sling
  • Baking times for Dutch ovens:
    • Use a cookie sheet on the bottom rack to deflect heat
    • If you don’t put it in cold, then bake at 475 for 25 minutes, take off top, and bake at 425 for 15 minutes more, or until it reaches 205 degrees.
    • From the fridge: Bake at 425 for 35 minutes covered, then 10 – 15 uncovered.
  • If kitchen really hot overnight: ferment it three hours and them put it in the fridge overnight.
  • Day of: Ferment 8 hours
  • Or you could increase the yeast a bit. This would shorten the rise time, and have only a slight affect on flavor and texture. I think if you use 1 teaspoon yeast (instead of 1/2 teaspoon) the first rise could be shortened to 4-5 hours. The second rise will also go quicker as well.
  • This recipe should fill two standard loaf pans, (8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″) and bake for 30-40 minutes or until the interior registers 190°F on an instant thermometer. Annabelle@KAF  375 degrees tent foil over the top during the first part of baking
  • make this in my 4.5 qt cast iron dutch oven. I let it rise for 12 hours at room temperature. then work it on a floured board and transfer it to a bowl lined with floured parchment paper for one hour. I preheat the oven to 450 degrees for about an hour. At the half hour mark I place the Dutch oven in the oven to preheat. Be careful pulling it outRead more about review stating I make this
  • as it is very hot. I transfer the dough to the dutch oven place the lid back on and bake for 25 minutes. I then remove the lid and bake an additional 12 minutes. I came up with these times though trial and error along with advice from King Arthur helpline. it comes lightly brown and crusty
  •  baked it in a 10″ dutch oven (50 min with lid on and 15 min with lid off — perfect!). I let it rise the first time about 18 hours at room temp
  • Or you could increase the yeast a bit. This would shorten the rise time, and have only a slight affect on flavor and texture. I think if you use 1 teaspoon yeast (instead of 1/2 teaspoon) the first rise could be shortened to 4-5 hours. The second rise will also go quicker as well.
  • 1 Tbs (15g) less water, halved the sugar, added to a preheated empty pot instead of cold start (parchment “sling” works great). The second time dough was easier to handle and bread had much betterRead more about review stating So good and so
  • oven spring, with an airier crumb.
  • The second thing you can try is to preheat your Dutch oven base (if the manufacturer says that’s OK) with the oven

https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/recipes/no-knead-oat-bread-recipe

 oven once it came to 205. This is a hit with the whole family and will definitely make again!

Week 78: 육쪽마늘빵 Cream Cheese Garlic Bread

KOREA: Cream cheese garlic bread is a beloved street food in Seoul, can be a bit of an acquired taste for some of us. It’s chock full of garlic and herbs, but the sauce is sweet, which is not uncommon in Asia as many breads lean heavily towards being dessert-style. You can buy already made dinner rolls and just stuff them, but it’s fun to make the rolls, and then you’re guaranteed to have the correct shape and consistency.

I’m really happy to have an opportunity to introduce everyone to this food blogger. Even if you have no desire to make this, you should watch the video, and try your hand at just making the bun. It’s got a great tutorial on hand kneading, is really quirky and also kind of mesmerizing.

Week 77: Hard Rolls

These versatile rolls are a nice alternative to squishy dinner rolls, are great for sandwiches, and are also good for breakfast with butter and jam. Another fine recipe from one of my favorite bakers, John Kirkwood.

Below are the ingredients. Measure them all out beforehand, and then you can bake along with him. I suggest watching the video all the way through before you get started. This makes 6 rolls.

  • 340 warm water
  • 4g yeast (1 tsp)
  • 6g sugar (1 tsp)
  • 500g bread flour (or 400g bread, 100g whole wheat)
  • 8g salt (1 tsp)

Week 76: Yeasted Honey Corn Bread

This is a close second to Anadama Bread (Week 38). It’s not as complex, but that can be a good thing: the ingredients list is shorter and it doesn’t take as much time. I found the recipe on the Red Star Yeast website, which is a reliable source for bread recipes, and also has a great Resources page for all sorts of tips on bread baking. If you’re new to baking, it’s worth taking a look at it before you get started — and you should also check out Breademic’s Tips and Video pages, as well!

I made a few adjustments to the method, and included a couple of optional ingredients. My updated version is below; the original recipe is here. And, in case you’re wondering what the difference is between cornmeal, corn flour, polenta, and grits, this article from Epicurious has the answers!

  • 3 tablespoons (42g) unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup (85g) honey
  • 1 cup (237ml) whole milk
  • 1 cup (140g) yellow cornmeal
  • 2 1/2 to 3 cups (300-360g) all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons table salt
  • 1 (0.25oz) package (7g) or 2-1/4 teaspoons yeast
  • OPTIONAL
    • 2 Tbsp orange zest
    • 1 cup dried cranberries
  • Butter for the top
  1. Warm the milk with butter until butter melts. You can do this on the stovetop, or microwave.
  2. Add the honey, and stir until combined.
  3. Pour into the bowl of a stand mixer, or a large mixing bowl.
  4. Add cornmeal and whisk to combine.
  5. Let rest until temperature reaches120-130°F.
  6. Measure in 300g of flour, and the salt and yeast.
  7. Place bowl in the mixer which is fitted with the paddle attachment.
  8. Knead on medium-low speed for 5-7 minutes. If you need to add more flour, just add 1 Tbsp at a time — no more than 4, tops. Dough should be coming away from the sides, and be sticky, but not wet.
  9. Place dough in a greased bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 – 2 hours.
  10. Remove dough onto a lightly oiled surface, and flatten out to an 8″ rectangle.
  11. Starting on a short side, roll up the dough and place seam-side down in a greased 9×5-inch loaf pan.
  12. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled again, about 30 minutes to an hour. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375°F.
  13. Bake until the top is golden, about 40-45 minutes.
  14. Remove from tin, and brush with butter (it’ll melt as it touches the hot loaf).
  15. Let cool before slicing.

Week 75: Farmhouse Sourdough

My oh my, I don’t think a bread can get much better than this! I adapted it from Ken Forkish’s Pain au Bacon recipe in Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast, one of my all time favorite bread making cookbooks (see all my favorites here). After ditching a successful 20-year tech career, he opened up Ken’s Artisan Pizza and Ken’s Artisan Bakery in Portland, OR. and hasn’t looked back. He’s got quite a lot of video instructions for pizza and bread making on his website that every aspiring baker should view.

Step 1: Make the levain

  • 25g active starter
  • 100g white flour
  • 25g whole wheat
  • 100g warm water (85-90 degrees)
  1. Mix the starter, flours and water until incorporated.
  2. Cover, and let rest 9~10 hours.

Step 2: Prep bacon

  • 1/2 lb bacon
  1. Chop bacon into small pieces, and fry until nice and crisp
  2. Drain on paper towels
  3. Reserve 1 Tbsp bacon grease

Step 3: Make the autolyse

  • 432g white flour
  • 8g whole wheat
  • 342g warm water (85-90 degrees)
  1. Mix the flours and water together in a large bowl until incorporated
  2. Cover, and let rest for 30 minutes
  • 10g salt
  1. Sprinkle the salt onto the top of the dough and fold it in.

Step 4: Make dough

  • Levain
  • Autolyse
  • Bacon
  • Bacon fat
  1. Add the levain to the autolyse and use the pincer method to mix it in. See Ken demonstrating this method in the “Mixing By Hand” video here.
  2. Let rest, then spread the bacon fat over the top, and sprinkle the bacon over that.
  3. Mix again with the pincer method.

Step 5: Proof and knead

  1. The dough needs to rest for about 2 hours. Knead the dough using the stretch & fold method every 30 minutes. See the “Kneading during Proofing” videos on the Video page.

Step 6: Shape dough

  1. Gently remove dough onto a floured countertop, using a dough scraper.
  2. Dust flour around the perimeter, then lift sides just a bit and scoot the flour under.
  3. Lift sides up, then over to form a circular shape and tighten it up a bit.
  1. Flip over and push sides down and under with cupped hands to make the surface taught. See “Shaping” video on the Video page.
  2. Dust a proofing basket, or a tea towel placed in a bowl with a generous amount of flour.
  3. Gently lift than lower the dough into the basket, seam side down.
  4. Cover and proof about 3-1/2 to 4 hours.
  5. Cut a sling out of parchment paper to use for lowering the dough into your baking receptacle.
  1. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 475 degrees, and place a Dutch oven with lid (or any heavy pot that has a lid) inside to heat up as well.

Step 7: Bake

  1. When dough is proofed, place the paper sling on top of the basket/bowl, then a cutting board on top of that.
  2. Carefully invert so the dough is on the cutting board, and out of the container.
  3. Remove the Dutch oven/pot from the oven, remove lid, and carefully place dough inside.
  4. Replace the lid, then return the Dutch oven/pot back in the oven and bake for 30 minutes
  5. Uncover, reduce heat to 450, and bake for 30 minutes more, until it’s a medium dark brown.
  6. Let cool on a rack before slicing.